Met reden geloven


 
IndexFAQZoekenRegistrerenGebruikerslijstGebruikersgroepenInloggen

Deel | 
 

 Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)

Vorige onderwerp Volgende onderwerp Go down 
AuteurBericht
Alex
Admin
avatar

Aantal berichten : 487
Woonplaats : Geen vaste
Registration date : 25-04-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   di mei 22, 2007 4:33 am

'creation-flood-later times,' and a common theme, namely 'creation, crisis, continuance of man,' of the 'primeval proto-history' in the 'Atra-Hasis Epic,' the Sumerian Flood story, and the Sumerian King List, as well as in the Genesis account. He recognizes here 'a common literary heritage, formulated in each case in Mesopotamia in the early 2nd millennium b.c.'...However, there are also many differences between the Mesopotamian traditions and the Genesis account, in addition to the basic concepts of divine-human relationship." [ISI, "Genesis and Ancient Near Eastern Stories of Creation and Flood, p.47]
"As Lambert and Millard note [in Atra Hasis: Babylonian Story of the Flood], 'It is obvious that the differences [between the Genesis Flood account and the Babylonian Flood Account in Atra-Hasis] are too great to encourage belief in direct connection between 'Atra-Hasis' and Genesis, but just as obviously there is some kind of involvement in the historical traditions generally of the two peoples.'" [ISI, "Genesis and Ancient Near Eastern Stories of Creation and Flood, p.31ff; Note: if both peoples experienced a common flood, I think that might count as 'some kind of involvement'!]

S. M. Paul:

"Nevertheless, the differences between the biblical and the Mesopotamian accounts are much more striking that their similarities; each of them embodies the world outlook of their respective civilizations. In Genesis there is a total rejection of all mythology...[Differences include:]...Cosmogony is not linked to theogony. The pre-existence of god is assumed--it is not linked to the genesis of the universe. there is no suggestion of any primordial battle or internecine ware which eventually led to the creation of the universe...The primeval water, earth, sky, and luminaries are not pictured as deities or as parts of disembodied deities, but are all parts of the manifold work of the Creator...The story in Genesis, moreover, is nonpolitical: unlike Enuma Elish, which is a monument to Marduk and to Babylon and its temple, Genesis makes no allusion to Israel, Jerusalem, or the temple." [Ency. Judacia, s.v. "Creation", 5:1062]


Richard J. Clifford:

"Genesis I is obviously a cosmogony, though (as will be seen) its dependence on other ancient cosmogonies cannot be specified with any exactness... Though its prefatory function is paralleled in Mesopotamia, attempts to show that Genesis I is directly dependent on Enuma elish cannot be judged successful." [OT:CAANEB, pp.138,140]
"Given our present knowledge, however, it is difficult to prove that any single work is the source of Genesis I." [OT:CAANEB, p.141]
"If comparison with other cosmogonies does not prove dependence, it does reveal the emphases in Genesis." [OT:CAANEB, p.143]
"Genesis 2-11 moves in a different direction than the creation-flood genre of Mesopotamian literature...Atrahasis is a critique of the gods; their assembly is bumbling and fragmented; their leader is the bullying and cowardly Enlil [sic]. This unflattering picture is relieved only by the introduction of the wise and compassionate Enlil [sic] and Nintu. Fault lies with the gods rather than with human beings. The gods' miscalculations lead to the annihilation of the race, and their needs to its restoration. In Genesis, God does it right the first time and after the flood re-blesses the human race with his original words...Both Atrahasis and Genesis were written with a sense of confidence. Atrahasis shows confidence in the human race; people are necessary because the gods are generally lazy, shortsighted, and impetuous. Confidence in Genesis is founded on God's justice and mercy, and the reliability of the created world." [OT:CAANEB, p.149]
"Though Egyptian wisdom literature directly influenced such biblical books as Proverbs, Egyptian cosmogonies evidently have no direct influence." [OT:CAANEB, p.200]

Nahum Sarna:

"The story of Creation, or cosmology, that opens the Book of Genesis differs from all other such accounts that were current among the peoples of the ancient world. Its lack of interest in the realm of heaven and its economy of words in depicting primeval chaos are highly uncharacteristic of this genre of literature. The descriptions in Genesis deal solely with what lies beneath the celestial realm, and still the narration is marked by compactness, solemnity, and dignity.
There is abundant evidence that other cosmologies once existed in Israel. Scattered allusions to be found in the prophetic, poetic, and wisdom literature of the Bible testify to a popular belief that prior to the onset of the creative process the powers of watery chaos had to be subdued by God. These mythical beings are variously designated Yam (Sea), Nahar (River), Leviathan (Coiled One), Rahab (Arrogant One), and Tannin (Dragon). There is no consensus in these fragments regarding the ultimate fate of these creatures. One version has them utterly destroyed by God; in another, the chaotic forces, personalized as monsters, are put under restraint by His power.
These myths about a cosmic battle at the beginning of time appear in the Bible in fragmentary form, and the several allusions have to be pieced together to produce some kind of coherent unit. Still, the fact that these myths appear in literary compositions in ancient Israel indicates clearly that they had achieved wide currency over a long period of time. They have survived in the Bible solely as obscure, picturesque metaphors and exclusively in the language of poetry. Never are these creatures accorded divine attributes, nor is there anywhere a suggestion that their struggle against God could in any way have posed a challenge to His sovereign rule.
This is of particular significance in light of the fact that one of the inherent characteristics of all other ancient Near Eastern cosmologies is the internecine strife of the gods. Polytheistic accounts of creation always begin with the predominance of the divinized powers of nature and then describe in detail a titanic struggle between the opposing forces. They inevitably regard the achievement of world order as the outgrowth of an overwhelming exhibition of power on the part of one cod who then manages to impose his will upon all other gods.
The early Israelite creation myths, with all their color and drama, must have been particularly, attractive to the masses. But none became the regnant version. It was the austere account set forth it. the first chapter of Genesis that won unrivaled authority. At first it could only have been the intellectual elite in ancient Israel, most likely the priestly and scholarly circles, who could have been capable of realizing and appreciating the compact forms of symbolization found in Genesis. It is they who would have cherished and nurtured this version until its symbols finally exerted a decisive impact upon the religious consciousness of the entire people of Israel.
"Ancient Near Eastern literature provides no parallel to our Eden narrative as a whole, but there are some suggestions of certain aspects of the biblical Eden. The Sumerian myth about Enki and Ninhursag tells of an idyllic island of Dilmun, now almost certainly identified with the modern island of Bahrein in the Persian Gulf. It is a 'pure,' 'clean,' and 'bright' land in which all nature is a peace, where beasts of prey and tame cattle live together in mutual amity. Sickness and old age are unknown. The Gilgamesh Epic likewise knows of a garden of jewels. It is significant that our Genesis account omits all mythological details, does not even employ the phrase 'garden of God,' and place gold and silver in a natural setting." [JPS Torah Commentary, Genesis, pp.3, 1

G. Herbert Livingston:

"As a literary production, Genesis 2 and 3 have no parallel in ancient Near Eastern literature. The Epic of Adapa, often presented as a parallel, is not really so, either in literary structure, in moral emphasis, or in theological content." [PCE, p. 143]

Ake W. Sjoberg (en W.G. Lambert, zoals gerefereerd):

"As Gosta will see, I have in some cases parted from the 'Uppsala School' where, we have to admit, a strong stress was placed upon Mesopotamian influences on Old Testament concepts. I will begin with the Babylonian epic of creation, Enuma Elis, and agree with Professor W.G. Lambert that there was hardly any influence from that Babylonian text on the Old Testament creation accounts." ["Eve and the Chameleon", in In the Shelter of Elyon (Barrick and Spencer, eds), p217]

R. K. Harrison

"Genesis and Sumerian Historiography The Sumerians were evidently the first Near Eastern people to write as well as make history. They had a dynamic appreciation for life and kept records of all manner of happenings in both past and present. Some of these sources have survived in the form of king lists, official inscriptions commemorating the building of palaces and temples, court annals, chronicles, epic compositions (often based on historical personages and events, which had subsequently become overlaid with legend and myth), and a number of other nonliterary sources. Like most of the ancient Near Eastern peoples, the Sumerians were profoundly superstitious, and their great sense of inferiority virtually demanded that the course of events in the cosmos should be governed by decisions that came from superhuman beings. This feature was a prominent element in their myths and legends and indicated that, for them, history was primarily theocratic. The deities venerated by the Sumerians were originally the forces of nature as experienced personally; thus the metaphysical force that activated history had a distinctively elemental character to it and partook of reality in this special manner. The Sumerians began the Mesopotamian tradition of writing history against a cosmic background, presenting in their narratives what can best be described as a world view. In their cosmological material they represented themselves as one member-group of the human race that inhabited one of the four regions into which they had divided the world. The Sumerians had had a “golden age” in their history, when “there was no fear, no terror. Man had no rival” (S. N. Kramer, The Sumerians [1970], p. 262). But because the gods had planned unethical, immoral, and criminal behavior as part of human conduct, this state of bliss was short-lived. One Sumerian composition even spoke of the creation of woman against the background of the paradise-like land of Dilmun, located E of Sumer. In the story, a goddess healed one of the god Enki’s diseased organs, which proved to be a rib. Consequently the goddess came to be known as “the lady of the rib,” or, as an alternative translation, “the lady who makes live.” While this narrative clearly has little in common with that in Gen. 2, it makes the latter much more intelligible if envisaged against a Sumerian literary background rather than one involving the second temple and a post-exilic date, as nineteenth-century literary criticism would have had its adherents imagine. " [ISBE, revised Ed, 2:438f]

"Not all details of the relationship of the Myth of Adapa to the Eden narrative are clear or necessarily convincing, but some relationship does seem indicated. The contrasts, aside from obviously wide divergence in details and plots, are most profound and characteristic in the area of underlying religious outlook."
"The above survey has led many scholars to the conclusion that the biblical Eden narrative has roots in Ancient Near Eastern literature. Yet, as stated above, these parallels are fragmentary, dealing with only a few motifs each, and the discrepancies in detail are often great. How these gaps were bridged cannot be said with certainty, presumably because of ignorance of the process of transmission of Ancient Near Eastern literature to the Bible." [Ency. Judacia, s.v. "Paradise", 13:82]

Ik denk dat al deze quotes al genoeg zeggen. De experts op het gebied (op enkele uitzonderingen na, maar deze uitzonderingen zijn bijna nooit expert op het gebied van de cultuur van oud-Assyrië).

Verder, het is logisch dat elk verhaal wat over een schepping gaat bepaalde overeenkomsten vertoont. Wat wordt er gemaakt, door wie wordt het gemaakt, hoe werd het gemaakt, in weke tijd werd het gemaakt. Dit zijn gewoon noodzakelijke thema’s en overeenkomsten tussen deze thema’s zeggen niets over dat de verhalen van elkaar geleend hebben. Ook zijn er logischerwijs overeenkomsten in structuur, wat te maken heeft met het genre.

Daarnaast, ik geloof dat de schepping daadwerkelijk gebeurt is, anders zouden we ook hier niet zijn. En net als met verslagen van ooggetuigen verschillen die altijd. Het is dus ook net zo goed mogelijk om alle verhalen als verschillende verslagen van dezelfde gebeurtenis te lezen.

Conclusie: Het Genesis verhaal is uniek en heeft geen leentje buur gespeeld bij andere (Assyrische) verhalen.

Bron: Christian Think Tank (http://www.christian-thinktank.com/)

_________________
Credo quia absurdum ?!


Laatst aangepast door op di mei 22, 2007 4:57 am; in totaal 2 keer bewerkt
Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken http://hamorlehem.blogspot.com/
Kheops

avatar

Aantal berichten : 184
Leeftijd : 38
Woonplaats : Leuven
Registration date : 10-05-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   di mei 22, 2007 4:48 am

Heb je nu expres enkel naar tegenargumenten gezocht?
Ik meen mij een katholiek spreekwoord te herinneren over een duivel en een wijwatervat.
De naam van uw bron zegt me genoeg, leer is denken voor jezelf.

Doe mij is een plezier en zoek naar tegenargumenten voor de 270 andere gelijkaardige zondvloedverhalen...

Hier is een foto als leidraad:

Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken
Alex
Admin
avatar

Aantal berichten : 487
Woonplaats : Geen vaste
Registration date : 25-04-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   di mei 22, 2007 4:52 am

Als ik de naam van de bron had weggelaten, zou je het stuk dan wel gelezen hebben?!

Hoevaak moet ik het nu nog zeggen; BEOORDEEL EEN STUK NIET OP DE BRON OF SCHRIJVER, MAAR OP DE INHOUD EN ARGUMENTATIE!!!

Verder over de opmerking: "leer eens denken van jezelf", ik schat dat jij dat mooie plaatje ook zelf in elkaar hebt gezet?? (of komt ie van echt-nieuws.nl?) Jullie zeuren de hele tijd over goede bronnen, dus doe ik dat een keer, is het weer niet goed en moet ik met alleen zelfbedachte argumenten komen (als je het nog niet gezien had, die staan er ook tussen). Kortom; ik kan het kennelijk nooit goed doen.

Als je wat beter kijkt, zul je trouwens zien dat de mensen die ik quote echt niet allemaal gestoorde christenen zoals ik zijn hoor. Het zijn stuk voor stuk experts op het gebied van Egyptologie, Assyrische geschiedenis, etc.

Verder gaat dit stuk niet alleen over het Gilgamesh verhaal, maar ook over de andere verhalen die in je mooie plaatje staan.

_________________
Credo quia absurdum ?!


Laatst aangepast door op di mei 22, 2007 4:55 am; in totaal 2 keer bewerkt
Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken http://hamorlehem.blogspot.com/
Kheops

avatar

Aantal berichten : 184
Leeftijd : 38
Woonplaats : Leuven
Registration date : 10-05-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   di mei 22, 2007 4:54 am

Alex schreef:
Verder gaat dit stuk niet alleen over het Gilgamesh verhaal, maar ook over de andere verhalen die in je mooie plaatje staan.

Lees de topictitel nog is ...
Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken
Alex
Admin
avatar

Aantal berichten : 487
Woonplaats : Geen vaste
Registration date : 25-04-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   di mei 22, 2007 4:56 am

okey, ik pas de topictitel wel aan, de reden waarom er alleen Gilgamesh staat, is dat de rest er niet bij op paste...

_________________
Credo quia absurdum ?!
Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken http://hamorlehem.blogspot.com/
Kheops

avatar

Aantal berichten : 184
Leeftijd : 38
Woonplaats : Leuven
Registration date : 10-05-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   di mei 22, 2007 5:10 am

Heb er even een paar opgezocht en ze lijken mij toch niet echt wetenschappers.
En lees ik dat goed ... geef je toe dat je een gestoorde christen bent? lol!


Richard J. Clifford = Professor of Old Testament

G. Herbert Livingston = Reverend bij WILMORE FREE METHODIST CHURCH

R.K. Harrison = Professor of Old Testament at Wycliffe College
Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken
speedy



Aantal berichten : 130
Registration date : 26-04-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   di mei 22, 2007 5:16 am

Alex schreef:
okey, ik pas de topictitel wel aan, de reden waarom er alleen Gilgamesh staat, is dat de rest er niet bij op paste...
veel tegenargumenten, maar je kunt zo ook veel argumenten voor zoeken. Je kunt wel argumenten zoeken die het tegendeel bewijzen maar wat geloof je nou zelf? er staat in heel veel van je tegenargumenten, zou zo geweest kunnen zijn, it could be, ik denk dat ..... Feit is voor mij dat het scheppingsverhaal gebaseerd is op het Babylonische scheppingsverhaal, zo zie ik het, jij ziet het anders, prima! geen discussie over mogelijk! Internet vertrouw ik daarentegen niet als een betrouwbare bron, iedereen kan er wat over zeggen. Dan nu een argument voor uit het boek Wandelen over het water, Bijbelse beelden en hun geheim van Carel ter Linden: Wat betreft het Babylonische verhaal, deze was al vrij bekend in het Midden Oosten ten tijde van 2500 voor Christus. Het nieuwe verhaal dat wij uit Genesis kennen, is van veel later, vermoedelijk uit de 6de eeuw voor Christus.Dan komt naar wij zagen het boek Genesis tot stand, in de periode van de ballingschap van Juda, het restant van het twaalfstammenrijk Israël, in Babel. Dat laatste zal niet toevallig zijn: de Judese schrijver plaatst deze Babylonische geloofscultuur onder kritiek. Hij herschrijft vauit zijn eigen geloofsvisie het verhaal van de Babyloniërs. Er zijn om te beginnen geen goden ín meervoud meer. Er is in dit verhaal nog maar één God. Dat wil zeggen: de werkelijkheid waarin wij leven, is niet dubbelzinnig. Wij zijn, ook al begrijpen wij nog niet alles, door één laatste Werkelijkheid omgeven. Hoor Israël, zo luidt de centrale geloofsbeleidenis van Israël, 'de Heer uw God is Eén. Er is maar één eerste en laatste Werkelijkheid achter ons bestaan. Er mogen zich nog zoveel machten en krachten als goden aandienen, zij gelden niet, zij dragen de wereld niet; ze spoken wel rond, maar ze hebben uiteindelijk geen macht. Er is maar één God, en die ene God heeft het welzijn, het leven en de toekomst van de mens op het oog. Ik ben, zo beginnen de Tien Woorden, die aanwijzingen van God voor het leven van d emensen, Ík ben de Heer uw God die u uit het slavenhuis Egypte heb weggevoerd. Gij zult geen andere goden voor mijn aangezicht hebben. Met andere woorden: er is maar een God, en deze God is een bevrijdende God. Voortaan is alle theologie bevrijdingstheologie. Uit het Babylonische zondvloedverhaal blijft om zo te zeggen van die goden uiteindelijk alleen Ea over. De uitzondering wordt de regel. Het aangezicht van de ene godheid is niet dubbelzinnig - het is, hoe verborgen ook voor ons zijn kan, in wezen een aangezicht van een om mens en dier bewogen God.
Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken
speedy



Aantal berichten : 130
Registration date : 26-04-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   di mei 22, 2007 5:21 am

Kheops schreef:
Heb er even een paar opgezocht en ze lijken mij toch niet echt wetenschappers.
En lees ik dat goed ... geef je toe dat je een gestoorde christen bent? lol!


Richard J. Clifford = Professor of Old Testament

G. Herbert Livingston = Reverend bij WILMORE FREE METHODIST CHURCH

R.K. Harrison = Professor of Old Testament at Wycliffe College
gestoorde christen.... daar zijn andere namen voor christen-extremist, ultraorthodox toch! ben het wel met je eens wat betreft die wetenschappers Kheops.
Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken
Kheops

avatar

Aantal berichten : 184
Leeftijd : 38
Woonplaats : Leuven
Registration date : 10-05-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   di mei 22, 2007 6:18 am

Katholieke fundamentalisten zijn voor mij even erg als moslimfundamentalisten.
Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken
Lineke



Aantal berichten : 46
Leeftijd : 25
Woonplaats : Putten
Registration date : 09-05-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   di mei 22, 2007 7:58 am

Tja... Weet je hoe ze dat noemen? Zelfspot. Jullie denken dat 'wij' gestoorde christenen zijn, dus gebruiken wij die naam ook maar, omdat we anders commentaar krijgen. Maar nou krijgen we dat dus weer... Zoals Alex al zei: het is ook nooit goed. Ga nou eens op de argumenten in ipv één detail eruit te pikken waarin je vervolgens al je frustraties loost.
Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken http://lineke.brinkblijdorp.nl/index.htm
Kevin

avatar

Aantal berichten : 169
Leeftijd : 31
Registration date : 08-05-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   wo mei 23, 2007 2:51 am

Veel meningen maken nog geen feit... De meningen van de zelfbenoemde wetenschappers in je stukjes zijn dan ook irrelevant en de argumentatie om hun mening te onderbouwen is voor een groot deel gesteld op tegengestelde logica (gras is groen, kikkers zijn groen, kikkers zijn van gras).

De tijd tussen het epos van gilgamesh en het genesis verhaal klopt trouwens niet.. het is niet 1000 jaar, het zijn enkele duizenDEN (4, a 5000) In die tijd gingen verhalen van mond op mond en niet van geschrift op geschrift.. Hierdoor veranderde het verhaal en groeide het met de tijd/plaats mee.

Als je kijkt wat er naast enuma elish en het epos van gilgamesh nog allemaal 'nét niet overeen komt' met de joodse cultuur uit die tijd zal het je verbazen.

http://www.cmo.nl/cc/cc-1/cc-2.html

Let op het teken voor man en denk dan aan de ichtus Wink opeens is de vis geen vis meer, vooral als je let op het vrouwelijke teken (de kelk) en plotseling doorkrijgt waarom de ichtus eigelijk meer lijkt op 'dát' (een falus) dan op een vis pirat Een vis is namelijk van de zijkant gezien alles behalve horizontaal symetrisch.



http://www.lilith.demon.nl/lilith-draak.html

Enki is tevens een godheid uit enuma elish.



Veel leesplezier.
Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken
Kevin

avatar

Aantal berichten : 169
Leeftijd : 31
Registration date : 08-05-07

BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   wo mei 23, 2007 3:34 am

http://www.nissaba.nl/nisphp/viewtopic.php?t=216
Terug naar boven Go down
Profiel bekijken
Gesponsorde inhoud




BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)   

Terug naar boven Go down
 
Het scheppingsverhaal; een bewerking v. Gilgamesh, etc? (2)
Vorige onderwerp Volgende onderwerp Terug naar boven 
Pagina 1 van 1

Permissies van dit forum:Je mag geen reacties plaatsen in dit subforum
Met reden geloven :: Bible, faith and science :: Gesloten topics-
Ga naar: